Dreams – what do they mean?

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The Moon of the Tarot represents the realm of the subconscious… The realm of dreams….

What are dreams and why do we have them? The ancients believed them to be cryptic communiqués from the Gods. In more recent times, Sigmund Freud held dreams to be revelations of repressed anxieties whilst his student, Carl Jung, considered them to be important messages we can use to resolve problems. They come in a variety of forms: vivid, pleasant, nightmarish, recurring… Here are seven of our most common dreams and their meanings.

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1. Falling

We will all experience the sensation of falling in a dream at least five times in a lifetime. It is agreed that this type of dream is indicative of losing control of a particular aspect of your life. Through the act of falling, we are being subconsciously prompted to reclaim the initiative and organise ourselves better.

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2. Naked in a Public Place

One of the most unpleasant dreams is to find yourself stark naked in a public place! Are you afraid of being found out for making a mistake? Facing up to the situation now and being honest will always gain you respect in the eyes of your peers. This could be daunting, but you won’t be spotted au naturel in dreamland again!

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3. Not Prepared for an Exam

There is nothing worse than not being ready to sit an exam. The dreamer may never even enter the exam room, but the feelings of helplessness are terrifying. Students are being warned to take more responsibility for their studies. The dream may also represent a fear of failure and of new challenges. Remember the mantra: if at first you don’t succeed, try and try again…

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4. Being Chased

Your legs seem to be encased in concrete and whoever (or whatever) is pursing you is gaining ground rapidly… This dream is said to symbolise a refusal to stand up to a particular person, or problem, in your life. Can you identify your pursuer? If so, you will discover the source of your consternation. If you cannot see this threat, you may in fact be running away from an unsavoury aspect of yourself.

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5. Missing a Train, Bus or Plane

In the internet age, we all have hectic schedules and it is normal to miss a transport connection. Dreaming about such a stressful occurrence is commonplace and suggests that you need to think more carefully about your time management. Perhaps your diary is too full and it’s time for a vacation? It could also indicate that you are feeling regret for not seizing an opportunity.

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6. Flying
The feeling is normally exhilarating. Dreamers who recount ‘flying’ during their sleep usually do so positively. This phenomenon reveals that you are attaining new giddy heights in personal development. Be proud of your achievements and continue to reach for the stars. However, if you feel somewhat ‘tethered’ to the ground in your dream, something in waking life may be holding you back.

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7. Dreaming of a Deceased Loved One

When a dearly departed family member or friend pays you a visit during your dream, it should be considered a great blessing. Many cultures believe that this is actually the spirit of the deceased returning to offer reassurance and guidance. The more vivid the dream is, the more details you can draw upon in order to find a solution to a problem.
We hope this short guide will help you unlock the mysteries of your dreams. Why not keep a pen and paper at the side of your bed and write them down on waking? Because, as Shakespeare once said: ‘We are such stuff as dreams are made on.’

The author of the article is David Fox, a professional entertainer based in the UK. David also functions as a freelance writer. His website is: www.davidfoxmagic.co.uk

Do you have any of your own stories you would like to share with us? Send an email to: email@magician-midlands.co.uk

UFO Attack! The Strange Tale of Robert Taylor – A Victim of Alien Assault?

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An artist’s impression of what Taylor reported

Since time immemorial human beings have pondered the existence of alien life. Are we alone in this universe? Or do intelligent beings exist which could pose a threat to our very existence?

I have always harboured an interest in UFOs (Unidentified Flying Objects) and this was piqued following a very illuminating conversation with a security guard at Cambridge University several years ago. The gentleman in question told me about his career working with the police at airports around the UK.

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Strange objects in the sky are reported every day like this saucer in New York State, 1966

He reminisced about the first time he obtained a statement from a distressed pilot regarding a strange object that had circled his plane over the North Sea. Poker-faced, the policeman dutifully recorded the aviator’s observations and filed the report. As a hardened law enforcer, he dismissed the captain’s account as a delusion – possibly triggered by fatigue or stress. Nonetheless, after taking scores of similar statements by the time he decided to retire several years later, his opinion had somewhat softened. He was now willing to believe in the existence of extra- terrestrials, and had even observed some perplexing phenomena in the sky himself.

However, this is not the only example of the authorities seriously considering the existence of intelligence beyond our world. The bizarre story of Robert Taylor (1919 – 2007) from Livingston, West Lothian, resulted in the police opening a criminal investigation. To date, it is the only known case of a law enforcement agency filing criminal charges as a result of a potential alien assault.

On the evening of 9th November 1979 Taylor, a forestry worker, appeared at his home in Livingston in a distressed state. His clothing was torn and he bore scratches on his face and legs. His anxious wife promptly summoned a doctor along with the local constabulary.

Taylor explained that he had parked his van close to the M8 motorway and entered woodland at Dechmont Law. After walking along a path for several hundred yards, he suddenly became aware of an acrid burning odour. Suddenly, in a clearing before him, a large ‘silver domed’ object loomed large.

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Many UFO photographs and sightings are hoaxes like this one from Sheffield, UK

The dark silvery saucer hovered above the treeline and appeared to have propellers. Taylor was only able to observe the craft briefly before he was set upon by a host of aggressive spherical entities. The metallic balls seized him and attempted to drag him towards the mother ship. After struggling violently for a few moments he lost consciousness.

When Taylor awoke, the UFO and its sinister crew had vanished. On returning to his van, he was unable to start the engine and was forced to trudge back home to Livingston in a disorientated and ragged state.

Incredibly, the police took Taylor’s account very seriously and he accompanied them on a trip back to the site of his alleged attack. Mysterious markings were found in the clearing and a criminal investigation was duly opened.

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Taylor returned to the scene of his attack with the police, and strange markings were found around the clearing

A commemorative plaque has since been placed at the site, and Ufologists celebrate Taylor’s close encounter as evidence that we are not alone. The fact that the authorities chose to accept his account as credible helps to legitimise their cause. However, sceptics are not so convinced. Some believe that the forestry worker may have experienced some sort of break-down or seizure; whilst others dismiss the Dechmont UFO as a crude hoax.

Nonetheless, the case will continue to raise many questions. Why were the police so willing to accept Taylor’s account? And for what purpose would he fabricate such an outlandish story which could potentially harm his reputation?

Do you have any other interesting stories about UFOs or strange phenomena? If so, please email them to us at: email@magician-midlands.co.uk

The author of the article is David Fox a professional entertainer and freelance writer based in the UK.

Follow David on Facebook: www.facebook.com/davidfoxmagician

Twitter: DavidFoxMagic

Website: www.davidfoxmagician.co.uk

 

 

 

Belmez Faces, Spain – La Casa de las Caras

Since the early 1970s thousands of inquisitive souls have paid a visit to an undistinguished house in Bélmez, Andalusia, Spain. The reason for their peculiar pilgrimage is truly fascinating and represents one of the most sensational supernatural stories of modern times.

The terrifying tale began in August 1971 when Maria Gómez Cámara witnessed what appeared to be a human face mysteriously materialising upon the concrete floor of her kitchen. She was so petrified that her husband and son forcibly removed the menacing visage with tools, and hastily re-concreted the area.

An innocuous house in Andalusia was the site of an incredible supernatural occurrence.

Alarmingly, several days later the same face reappeared. This time it was much more vivid and wore a hauntingly distressed expression. The family began to speculate that some sort of supernatural entity might be at work. News of the phenomenon quickly spread throughout the local community and the Mayor suggested that the flooring be carefully extracted for scientific investigation.

The mysterious happenings in Bélmez attracted international media attention, as well as the interest of scientists, clairvoyants and psychical investigators. More spectral images began to form upon the kitchen floor which further fueled speculation. Indeed, when the room was finally sealed off for investigation, cameras recorded the faces eerily forming upon the concrete by their own accord. An unseen spectral hand seemed to be fashioning the images from out of the ether! Microphones also detected unnerving disembodied voices and unexplained sounds around the house.

Scientists have conducted painstaking research into the strange faces.

Sceptics argue that there must be a logical explanation for the faces and it is merely a highly sophisticated hoax. As a result of the weird occurrences, Bélmez has enjoyed much welcome publicity and an increase in passing trade. The possible presence of a ghost can indeed bring many economic benefits to an otherwise isolated location and motivate the unscrupulous.

The house was built upon a medieval cemetery and clairvoyants believe witchcraft and sorcery was practiced in the area.

Nonetheless, no conclusive explanation has been presented to explain the mystery. One notable parapsychologist has even suggested that Thoughtography (the ability to transfer one’s thoughts onto a solid surface) may have created the images. Furthermore, several clairvoyants who have visited La Casa de las Caras (The House of the Faces) have all cryptically agreed that a tragic event associated with witchcraft occurred there during medieval times. Strangely, workmen who dug beneath the house unearthed the remnants of a cemetery dating back to this period. Could the spectral faces be a desperate message from the other side?

The Casa de Las Caras now functions as a museum. The address is: Calle Maria Gomez, 5, 23568 Bélmez de la Moraleda, Jaén, Spain.

The author of the article is David Fox. A professional entertainer and freelance writer based in the UK. Visit his website at: www.davidfoxmagician.co.uk. Follow on Facebook: www.facebook.com/davidfoxmagician

 

Dion Fortune – Sane Occultism

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‘the material plane, as we see it, is the end result of a long chain of evolutionary processes that have gone on in the subtler planes, the realms of spirit, mind and astral ether’

Dion Fortune, (1890 – 1946) otherwise known as Violet May Firth, continues to cast her formidable influence over seekers of the Old Wisdom. An early practitioner of psychotherapy, Fortune was introduced to The Path through the Theosophical Society during the First World War. Blessed with both powerful intellect and steely volition, she would become one of the most prolific and widely read Occult writers of all time.

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The Qabalah forms the basis of Western Occultism

In 1924 Fortune co-founded the Fraternity of the Inner Light with Charles Loveday. The group continues to function today as The Society of the Inner Light and offers spiritual guidance for those so inclined. Promoting a Christian morality, the order draws from the teachings of the Golden Dawn and utilises the Qabalah as a framework for personal development.

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Like Madame Blavatsky, Dion Fortune claimed to commune with higher entities.

Indeed, like Madame Blavatsky before her, Fortune believed that she had communed with Masters beyond the physical realms who imparted great wisdom and insight. ‘The Cosmic Doctrine’ (eventually published in 1949) provides an explanation of the creation and machinations of the universe itself. The text also reveals the individual’s place and role within the great cosmic schemata.

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‘The Mystical Qabalah’ has long been essential reading for those seeking spiritual guidance.

‘The Mystical Qabalah’ (1935) is arguably Fortune’s tour-de-force and candidly demonstrates her tremendous talents and profound appreciation of the Western Esoteric Tradition.  Regarded as a classic of the esoteric cannon, it is still widely studied throughout the world nearly a century after publication.

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‘Through The Gates of Death’ is an extraordinary text.

Other texts of note include: ‘Through The Gates of Death’ (1930) and ‘Psychic Self Defence’ (1930). The former is an extraordinary exposition of the astral realms and the process we all must face upon shedding this mortal coil. Fortune addresses this subject with tremendous insight and sensitivity. The latter is essential reading for anyone who decides to embark upon the practice of ceremonial magic, or who may suspect they are a victim of psychic attack.

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Fortune’s novels remain highly entertaining and readable.

Like all the great occultists, Fortune understood and appreciated how ancient wisdom can be communicated to students via the medium of art. The author of several novels such as ‘The Winged Bull’ (1935) and ‘The Secrets of Dr Taverner’ (1926), they are still highly entertaining, readable, and contain invaluable pearls of wisdom for us all to absorb and appreciate.

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During the dark years of World War Two, Fortune and her associates used magick to thwart the enemy.

Throughout the dark years of World War Two, Fortune drew upon her immense occult knowledge and magical talents to combat the menace of the Third Reich. Her travails are documented in ‘The Magical Battle of Britain’ ( a collection of letters from the war period advising members of her society on how to assist the nation through powerful visualisation techniques). A proud patriot, much of Fortune’s work is influenced by the rich folklore of the British Isles.

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In the 1940s Fortune struck up a friendship with Aleister Crowley.

During the 1940s Fortune initiated a fruitful correspondence with the Great Beast 666, Aleister Crowley who was now in his twilight years. Indeed, such a relationship between two seemingly diametrically opposed personalities may appear bizarre to the casual observer. However, both Fortune and Crowley appreciated each other’s genius and would later meet in Hastings. Fortune became sympathetic to Crowley’s doctrine of Thelema (Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law) and was sophisticated enough to see beyond the Beast’s notoriety – recognising his exceptional intellect and wisdom.

The Society of the Inner Light’s website provides details of their aims and philosophy: www.innerlight.org.uk

Dion Fortune’s works and rare occult texts can be purchased from Thoth Publications of Loughborough: www.thoth.co.uk Visit their website for an extensive range of titles or contact them for expert advice today.

The author of the article is David Fox, a professional entertainer and freelance writer based in the UK. Visit David’s website for more details now: www.davidfoxmagician.co.uk

Superstition and Football – Bizarre Beliefs of the Beautiful Game

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Zidane is well-known for his curious pre-match rituals

The great Bill Shankly famously stated that football is ‘much more serious’ than a matter of life and death. Perhaps this is the reason why superstition abounds within the realms of the beautiful game. From Zidane and Maradona’s much publicised pre-match rituals, to Johan Cruyff’s charmed chewing gum, footballers the world over are well known for embracing the weird and the wonderful in the hope it will ensure good fortune once the white line is traversed.

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Elland Road was said to be cursed.

Leeds United’s legendary manager Don Revie was renowned for his lucky blue suit and superstitious nature. However, on receiving a letter from a gypsy in 1971, Revie decided to take things a stage further. The author insisted that Elland Road (Leeds’ stadium) was cursed as a group of gypsies had been forced off the land prior to its construction. Suffering from an unexpected loss of form at the time and dropping points, the manager duly invited a gypsy to the stadium in order to remove the curse. ‘Now you’ll start winning things’ she said after conducting a peculiar ritual on the pitch. Leeds would subsequently go on to produce some of the finest displays of Revie’s tenure and secure three more major trophies. Did the gypsy work her magic, or was it merely coincidental?

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Bela Gutman. Did he curse Benfica?

Perhaps Portuguese giants Benfica should take note of Revie’s faith in the supernatural. In the early 1960s the club was a major superpower and won the European Cup twice under the management of the mythical Bela Guttman. However, after achieving such incredible success, the Hungarian impresario was incandescent when the board denied him a pay rise. On leaving the club, he angrily proclaimed that Benfica would not win another European trophy for one hundred years. To date, the Portuguese side have been losers in eight major finals. Many Benfica fans now firmly believe that their club has been cursed.

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The great Pelé insisted his lucky shirt be found and returned

Even items of clothing take on mystical properties in the high pressure world of professional football. The sensational Pelé’s dramatic decline in form over several matches during the mid 1960s was attributed to the loss of his ‘lucky shirt’. The Brazilian master had kindly presented this to an adoring Santos supporter after a match. A close friend was hastily called upon to track down the special jersey. On its return, Pelé felt rejuvenated and his genius swiftly reappeared. Little did he know that his concerned companion had committed an act of chicanery by procuring another used shirt and pretending it was the lucky one!

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England Captain Bobby Moore

England’s World Cup winning captain Bobby Moore always insisted on being the last player in the changing room to put on his shorts, whilst striker Gary Lineker requested a shirt change at half time if he had yet to find the net. Both players boast a combined total of 188 international caps between them, so perhaps there really is a mysterious link between superstition and success?

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Raymond Domenech openly declared his belief in astrology.

Nonetheless, no matter how much footballers may be willing to embrace the irrational to win matches, they clearly do have their boundaries, as French international manager Raymond Domenech discovered. His reliance on astrology when selecting which players to include in his squad frequently attracted ridicule. The dramatic fall out between Domenech and his team at the 2010 World Cup finals ultimately lost him his job. Another international manager who would fall foul to sceptics was Glenn Hoddle. His policy of calling upon the services of faith-healer Eileen Drewery (who had assisted him with a knee injury as a young player) left him open to scathing criticism.

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Kolo Touré insisted on being the last man out.

Touching wood, putting a right boot on first and sporting a lucky charm are all common-place superstitions. Indeed, the same habits will be repeated in dressing rooms across the land throughout the highs and lows of the footballing season. One such belief, strangely held by many players, is that they will have a good game if they are the last man out of the dressing room. Arsenal defender Kolo Touré took this to the extreme during his side’s 2009 Champions League clash with Roma. Team-mate William Gallas was receiving treatment at half time and Touré insisted on waiting until this was finished. His obstinance resulted in Arsenal starting the second half with nine men and him receiving a yellow card for entering the field of play late without the referee’s permission. Fortunately for Touré, Arsenal finished 1 – 0 winners.

Do you have any strange superstitions or unusual stories you would like to share? Why not email them to us at: email@magician-midlands.co.uk

The author of the article is David Fox a professional entertainer and freelance writer based in the UK. For more about David, visit his website at:

www.magician-midlands.co.uk

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Voodoo – Priests, Potions and Papa Doc

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‘There is not a shred of doubt in my mind today that the African, in his own mysterious ways, has harnessed one of the strangest powers of all — the thing they call Ju-ju.’

James H. Neal

Thousands of men were at work constructing the new harbour at Tema Port, Ghana. The colossal project involved the clearance of vast swathes of land with state-of-the-art bulldozers and machinery. However, in the midst of the bustling industry, one solitary tree trunk refused to budge. Despite being subjected to numerous attempts to uproot it from the ground, it appeared to defy all logic, and stood obstinately intact in the centre of the barren landscape.

‘This tree be Fetish’ explained a local tribesman to a government official who had been assigned to oversee the work. The civil servant was bemused and clearly did not understand this curious statement.

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A Fetish is said to represent a powerful spirit (loa).

Essentially, the man was suggesting that a powerful spirit (loa) dwelled within the tree. In Voodoo tradition if an object is said to be ‘Fetish’ it is effectively the host of such an entity. The only way that the tree could be removed successfully would be if a Fetish Priest was called in order to conduct an appropriate ceremony. Such a Holy Man was duly summoned. On arrival, the Priest explained that he would speak to the spirit and see if he could persuade it to move to another tree.

After entering a trance-like state, the Priest concluded that the ceremony had been a success, the spirit believed that the new harbour would bring many benefits to the local people and agreed to move on. Then, amazingly with minimal effort, the workmen were able to perform what was unthinkable a few hours before. The tree yielded obediently in the baked solid soil revealing a massive lattice of jagged roots for all to see.

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Baron Samedi the loa of the dead. Mainstream representations of Voodoo are much distorted.

There are many such incredible anecdotes regarding the mysterious religion most commonly known as ‘Voodoo’. In West Africa (where it originated) it is often called Vodun. As Alfred Metraux has noted, the peoples of this region have ‘kept alive beliefs and rituals inherited from the ancient religions of the classical East and the Aegean world.’ Voodooists identify with a sophisticated pantheon of Gods and spirits. Indeed, the religion may have evolved in the New World in countries such as Haiti, Brazil and the USA, but there remain clear similarities with the root practices. Christianity has been synthesised with Voodoo and particular saints have come to be associated with the loa (spirits) of Voodooism. For example Saint Patrick often represents Damballah-Wedo (the snake God) on account of his affinity with the reptiles.

Ceremony, ritual and trance are vital components of Voodoo, and the hunsi (initiates) meet at hunfort (a secluded place) to pay homage to the spirits. A clear hierarchy exists, and the hungan (priest) and/or mambo (priestess) will oversee the proceedings. Indeed, the sacrifice of animals, lively music and often frenzied dancing, led many westerners in the past to look down upon the religion and dismiss it as mere ‘sorcery’ or ‘black magic’. However, with an estimated half a billion followers throughout the world, Voodoo is clearly a vital aspect of daily existence for many.

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Papa Doc who ruled Haiti from 1957 to 1971 used Voodoo to exert his control over the masses.

Many may view Voodoo with suspicion and disdain on account of its distorted mainstream image. Popular media representations such as Ian Fleming’s Bond novel ‘Live and Let Die’ have fuelled both intrigue and fear. The infamous Voodoo Doll, amulets, potions and the casting of spells represent a belief system which appears to be the complete antithesis of Christianity. Nonetheless, it must be understood that a true Voodooist is  aware and respectful of the subtle forces which exist in nature. The axiom of ‘do unto others as you would have them do to you’ should always apply.

Clearly more serious study is required regarding the origins, evolution and influence of Voodoo throughout the world. Alfred Metraux’s research on Haitian practices throughout the 1940s and 1950s is most illuminating. However, it is understandable that practitioners may choose to be less than forthcoming to academics when Voodoo is often regarded with such suspicion and contempt. In nations which ostensibly champion Christianity as the official religion, Voodoo is frequently dismissed as a cult and deliberately marginalised from mainstream consciousness.

The author of the article is David Fox, a professional entertainer and freelance writer based in the UK. Visit David’s website for more information: www.magician-midlands.co.uk.

Vincent Price’s Peculiar Premonition

A dramatic case of deja vu…

The great Vincent Price (1911 to 1993) achieved legendary status in classic horror movies such as Dracula, The Fly, The Masque of the Red Death and The Witchfinder General. He also famously provided the narration for Michael Jackson’s Thriller and was a colossus of the acting profession. However, for a man who became synonymous with the Horror genre, Price initially had very little interest in the paranormal. That was until a most peculiar event occurred in 1958.

A storm over New York delayed landing.

Price was flying to New York when a storm flared up causing the pilot to delay landing. As the aircraft circled high above the seething cauldron of dark clouds, the actor felt a curious urge to look out of the window. As he peered into the darkness, a sudden flash of lightning seemed to dance through the twilight and reveal a cryptic message which hung ominously in the sky:

 TYRONE POWER IS DEAD

Shocked and startled, Price asked the passenger beside him to look out and verify that the message was real. Bizarrely when they both looked out into the gloom, the sinister words had vanished. The performer was extremely perturbed and distressed by this weird event. Had he imagined this? Was it merely some sort of queer trick of the light? His mind turned to Tyrone Power himself (a close friend) and a terrible feeling of dread began to grip his entire being.

Hollywood star Tyrone Power

Power lived near Price in Los Angeles, and the two superstars had struck up a close and enduring friendship. Well known for his roles in classic movies such as The Mark of Zoro, Tyrone Power had established himself as one of Hollywood’s biggest box office draws, and was a household name the world over.

On alighting from the aircraft, Price frantically asked police and staff at the airport if they had seen the strange message in the sky. His inquiries were promptly dismissed and the actor was quickly ushered through the terminal. Even a fleeting consultation of the most recent newspapers on display did not yield any mention of Tyrone Power. Was he going mad? He was certain he had seen those terrifying words high above the Big Apple.

Vincent Price in one of his most famous roles as Count Dracula.

Later that evening Vincent Price checked into his hotel in central New York and had just about managed to forget the disturbing events of his journey. Suddenly in the lobby he spotted an old acquaintance from his early years in acting striding anxiously towards him.

‘Vincent, have you heard the news?’ inquired the man. ‘Tyrone Power died of a heart attack in Madrid tonight.’

The author of the article is David Fox who is a freelance writer and entertainer based in the UK. Visit David’s website at:

http://www.magician-midlands.co.uk