Spirits on Film?

Is it really possible to photograph those who have passed on?

Magician David Fox explores…

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Sir Victor Goddard’s RAF squadron circa 1919

This year we commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of World War One and the above photograph of an RAF squadron was taken in 1919 after the cessation of hostilities. The men and women in this image all served in the same unit during the conflict alongside Sir Victor Goddard (who took the shot). Uncannily a mysterious spectral face can be seen to the rear of the fourth gentleman from the left on the back row.

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The image of Freddy Jackson, who had died two days before, appears behind the back row.

Members of the squadron quickly identified the man to be Freddy Jackson; a mechanic, who had been tragically killed in an accident two days before the photograph was taken. Indeed, Jackson’s funeral took place on the day of this group shot and his subsequent appearance in the image raises some profound questions. Is it possible to capture evidence of an afterlife using photographic equipment? Or is this merely an example of an elaborate hoax conducted by individuals of superior technological wisdom?

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Newby Church altar 1963. The photograph was taken by Reverend Lord and experts cannot explain the mysterious shrouded figure.

Ghost hunters, psychic investigators and spiritualists have long argued that it is indeed possible to record evidence of the departed by using even the most basic of recording equipment. In recent years it is not only photographs of supposed spirit forms which have entered the public domain, but a whole variety of film clips boasting both visual and audio ‘evidence’ of a seemingly otherworldly nature. Exponents of this viewpoint argue that experts can visit notorious venues of preternatural phenomena and use their sensitivity and awareness to successfully ‘record’ the activities of the deceased. So-called ‘ghost-hunts’ at apparently haunted venues have become commonplace throughout the UK and have provided a much welcome source of revenue to hoteliers.

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The gardens to the rear of Thrumpton Hall in Nottinghamshire. Note the curious misty ‘figure’ to the centre left.

My vocation takes me to many spectacular locations throughout the British Isles and it is incredible how many venues I perform at which are said to be ‘haunted’. It always strikes me as nothing short of extraordinary how even the most level-headed and austere of hotel managers can suddenly divulge his or her own spine-chilling account of nocturnal queerness on the premises. Such people seem to be fully convinced in the existence of an afterlife and the occurrence of supernatural activity around their venues. Indeed, prior to most performances I always take a few photographs around the hotels, halls and stately homes I am fortunate enough to perform magic at. On a closer inspection, it is rather peculiar that I do often find unusual shapes, orbs and irregularities among the images. For example, the most recent being the misty ‘figure’ in the trees to the rear of Thrumpton Hall in Nottinghamshire (see photograph above). I since discovered that this venue is also said to be haunted by the ghost of a servant girl who took her own life.

For more information about the author, why not visit David’s website: David Fox Illusionist Extraordinaire

Colin Wilson – The Outsider

Magician David Fox pays tribute to a genuis.

‘From a fairly early age, I developed the conviction that most people waste their lives because they see the world falsely… such a person accepts a set of social values without question, like a sheep that never feels curious about what lies on the other side of the hedge.’

Colin Wilson

The great Oscar Wilde once stated that ‘we are all in the gutter but some of us are looking at the stars’. Such a profound aphorism readily defines the intriguing personality of one of Britain’s most prolific writers: Colin Wilson. A man who dedicated his life to the pursuit of greater understanding and knowledge; Wilson sought to push the boundaries and venture into areas of study which many (even in the 21st century) would view with scepticism, disdain, and even disgust. Wilson addressed a variety of subjects, from the 1950s onwards, which resided on the hinterland of modern rational twentieth century society. These included: the occult, true crime, sexuality and the psychology of serial killers. Indeed, Wilson seemed naturally motivated to venture into hitherto unexplored realms of  the human psyche, and articulated his findings masterfully and insightfully to his readership.

The publication of ‘The Outsider’ in 1956 quickly brought Wilson much acclaim. His analysis of  famous individuals throughout history who had been predisposed to rebel in one way or another against the prevailing social axioms of their ages, clearly tapped into the prevailing post-second world war zeitgeist. Wilson identified a tremendous sense of social alienation in all of these outsiders, from Vincent Van Gough to Albert Camus, and throughout his life he would remain a champion of existentialist thought and philosophy.

‘Civilisation cannot evolve further until ‘the occult’ is taken for granted on the same level as atomic energy.’

However, it was when Wilson was commissioned to produce an in-depth study of the occult that the focus of his work shifted onto what some would describe as ‘supernatural’. An extensive period of research spawned three seminal works in this area: ‘The Occult’ (1971), ‘Mysteries’ (1978) and ‘Beyond the Occult’  (1988). What is intriguing is that Wilson initially approached this vast subject as a sceptic, but quickly realised that it warranted serious consideration and analysis. The so-called ‘Occult Explosion’ of the 1960s demonstrated the perpetual human urge for deeper self-awareness and spiritual development. The Occident may have created the first nuclear weapons and sent rockets into space, but there appeared to be a spiritual void in the lives of many. Modern science and technology had without doubt alleviated much of life’s immediate problems, but the curious spirit of man knows no boundaries.

‘I believe that the human mind has reached a point in evolution where it is about to develop new powers – powers that would once have been considered magical.’

‘The Occult’ is a wonderful analysis of what some would define as the ‘magical arts’ through the ages. From the ancient Egyptians, to the Kabbalists and modern magicians such as Crowley and Gurdieff, Wilson provides an engaging thesis on an alternative viewpoint of human evolution. He clearly appreciates that from the late 17th Century onwards, cold rationalism began to stifle much of Western man’s potentialities: ‘The science of men like Albertus Magnus, Cornelius Agrippa and Paracelsus may have been crude and defective but it was based on this instinctive recognition of the psychic links between man and nature. The science of Newton, Huygens and Priestley was incomparably more accurate, but it had lost belief in the invisible links.’ Indeed, much of the evidence that Wilson presents in his studies on the occult surely demonstrates that modern science simply cannot provide satisfactory solutions for much of the phenomena we experience throughout our mortal existence.

‘Magic was not the ‘science’ of the past. It is the science of the future.’

Wilson essentially understood that a human being is far more complex (and potentially infinitely more powerful) than is fully appreciated in the modern technological era. We live most of our lives effectively ensconced within a bubble of accepted ‘facts’, rules, regulations, prejudices and misconceptions about our very existence and place in the universe. If only there was a way out? If only human beings could learn how to emancipate themselves from the often painful existence of mundane life? Wilson defines our largely latent potentialities as ‘Faculty X’ and appreciates that the human mind ‘has always possessed greater powers than we now realise: of telepathy, premonition of danger, second sight, thaumaturgy (the power to heal).’

‘…it is almost impossible to avoid the conclusion that the human mind is a vaster and stranger realm than we ever supposed.’

Wilson explored a myriad of fascinating subjects within the domain of the occult, these include: poltergeist activity, dowsing, spiritualism, ritual magic, life after death and astrology, to name but a few. His written style is highly engaging and he did confess that he saw himself as an author as opposed to a researcher (he was also a prolific novelist). Nonetheless, they do raise serious questions about modern science’s current uneasy relationship with these matters. Wilson has collected a wealth of data from a variety of sources throughout the world which does suggest that there are truly ‘more things in heaven and earth’. Approaching Wilson’s work with an open mind will most certainly provide the inquirer with much food for thought.

Telly Savalas’s Ghostly Encounter…

The Man Who Immortalised ‘Kojak’

Magician David Fox explores…

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The late, great Telly Savalas is most certainly not the type of personality one would associate with anything of a supernatural nature. Charismatic, straight-talking and with talent in abundance, Savalas became a household name from the 1970s onwards for his masterful portrayal of the indefatigable New York detective Kojak. Revered throughout Hollywood and beyond, the world-famous actor, singer and celebrity passed on in January 1994. However, it is a curious tale from the late 1950s which caught my attention several years ago…

A Stranded Motorist

 

The story involves Savalas’s bizarre experience when driving home from a social event in Long Island during the small hours. Accounts vary as to where he had been, but Savalas became stranded on a lonely stretch of highway after his car ran out of petrol. Pondering his rueful situation, he decided to leave his vehicle and seek out a service station.

A fortuitous encounter?

Eventually, after travelling on foot for some time, a passing motorist spotted the lonesome pedestrian, stopped his vehicle, and kindly offered Savalas a ride. The actor recounted how the driver of the car appeared to be rather unusual and spoke in a curiously high pitched and unnerving tone. Nonetheless he persevered with this rather eccentric nocturnal Samaritan, collected petrol at the station, and accepted a ride back to his abandoned vehicle. The mysterious driver even lent Savalas a few dollars to pay for the fuel and, feeling very embarrassed, the actor requested his name and telephone number so that he could return the funds to him in due course. Savalas also remembered the driver speaking suddenly about a relatively obscure baseball player. The sudden change in conversational topic had been rather unsettling to say the least. On arriving back at his car, Savalas duly thanked the man for all his help and bid him goodnight.

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Strange news…

Savalas returned to work the next day and quickly forgot about the events of the previous evening until he happened to notice a headline on the front page of a local newspaper. The story was about the sudden death of an up-and-coming baseball star. Bizarrely it was the very sportsman who the driver had spoken of during their journey together. Savalas decided to call the telephone number he had been given in order to return the borrowed money and put closure on the event. However, on telephoning, matters took an even more mysterious and disturbing twist….

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Who was the strange driver who gave Telly a ride?

The man from nowhere…

On phoning the hand-written number, Savalas was greeted by a woman’s voice. He promptly requested to speak to the gentleman who had assisted him the previous night. In no uncertain terms, the actor was informed that the man he asked for had been dead for some time. It eventually transpired that the woman at the end of the line was the ‘late’ driver’s widow and, after some deliberation, Savalas eventually managed to arrange a meeting with the lady.

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Tough guy. The only type of spirit we would usually associate with Telly would be found in a bar.

Fact or fiction?

Savalas showed the woman the scrap of paper which bore the telephone number and name of the spectral driver. The handwriting appeared to match with that of the deceased. He also discovered that the gentleman had shot himself through the throat which may have explained why his ‘ghost’ spoke with such a high-pitched accent.

Watch Telly Savalas’s accont on Youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Axdkv0_kJZQ

Want to know more about the author? Visit David Fox Magic for more details.

David Fox Magician

David Fox is a professional magician who is based in the Midlands, UK, and travels throughout the world performing his unique brand of prestidigitation. He specialises in close-up magic, parlour magic and stage magic. Magician David Fox creates many of his own incredible effects and sensational illusions.

Intersted in the performing arts? For music, art and inspiration, check out my friend’s new blog: BarbaraCalvertBenner

Clifton Hall: A Site of Supernatural Phenomena?

An Idyllic Country Manor…

Nestled away in the picturesque environs of Clifton Conservation Village to the south west of Nottingham city centre, the imposing Georgian architecture of Clifton Hall boasts a certain majestic charm. A striking reminder of a bygone age when the Lords of the Manor of Clifton celebrated their wealth and influence throughout Nottinghamshire and beyond. The hall has a colourful history, and in 1631 King Charles I resided there at the behest of Sir Gervase Clifton. Indeed, since the estate was sold off by the Clifton family in 1958, it has been utilised by several owners for much different purposes. Firstly as a girls’ grammar school until the 1970s, then by Nottingham Trent University, and later as private luxury accommodation. However, it was under its most recent ownership that Clifton Hall sprang to the attention of both local and national media outlets.

Haunted Hall?

Reports of Clifton Hall being a site of unusual and inexplicable phenomena would appear to date from the time when it was used as a grammar school from 1958 to 1976. There are accounts of strange eerie noises and an unsettling atmosphere in specific locations around the main building. An eye-witness account of the ghost of a young woman in the vicinity is also most revealing, and there appears to have been speculation about supernatural activity within rooms which had been sealed off. Sceptics would argue that such locations are ripe for curious tales of intrigue which are often intended to scare younger boarders and are the mere products of vivid adolescent imaginations. Nonetheless, it is the sensational experiences of the Rashid family, who moved into the hall in 2007, which have attracted much attention and speculation.

A Tormented Family…

In 2007 businessman Anwar Rashid acquired Clifton Hall for the sum of £3.6 million and moved into the property with his wife and four children. Within eight months the family would have left their new home, driven away by seemingly disturbing and unsettling forces from another dimension. An intriguing cavalcade of psychic phenomena contributed to the family’s hasty decision to quit their stately accommodation. Eerie events included: sinister spectral voices, ghostly sightings, and, perhaps most upsetting of all, the manifestation of blood stains upon one of the children’s bed sheets. Mr Rashid even went so far as to invite psychic investigators to Clifton Hall to reckon with its demonic denizens. The coordinator of this metaphysical inquiry curiously concluded that the venue was one of the most unsettling places he had ever visited, even throughout the hours of daylight. The family ceased mortgage payments in 2008 and since then it has been on the market awaiting a new buyer to negotiate with its supposedly supernatural tenants…

Illusion or Reality?

Did ghosts and supernatural phenomena really drive a family away from their new home? Is Clifton Hall truly an unholy lair of queer and unnatural events? Or perhaps there is a more logical explanation for the strange occurrences which would appear to have been experienced by a variety of individuals since its days as a grammar school? Last week I happened to be in Clifton meeting a client in order to prepare for a performance of magic at a function he is currently organising. On the way home, I decided to visit the hall and took some photographs around the area. The photograph below was taken at the main gate. Strangely a friend of mine (who is a psychic) examined my handiwork and felt a curious ‘presence’ at the central upper window in the shot. On a closer analysis of the picture, it is possible to see some unusual whispy ‘faces’ on both the central panes of the window. What do you think? Could this be evidence of some sort of weird supernatural manifestation, or is it simply the reflections of the trees in the sunlight?

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Below is a close-up shot of the window. It does look rather strange and no other window in any of the other photographs looks like this. I prefer to keep an open mind and reserve judgement.  The red and blue circles mark the possible outlines of spectral ‘faces’.

Clifton Ghosts

Haunted Venues

Make Your Next Hotel Stay An Interesting One…

I am extremely fortunate to perform magic regularly at fantastic venues throughout the UK and beyond. My vocation frequently takes me off the beaten track to obscure locations which offer their own peculiar allurements and fascinations. Indeed, every hotel, restaurant, club, bar, or stately home has an exclusive charm and appeal. However, local legends, superstitions, and the ‘lore of land’ always continue to intrigue and amaze travellers the world over. Some places would appear to be steeped with curious rumours concerning ghosts, inexplicable occurrences, and mysterious utterances of possible occult phenomena. Thus, I decided to write about several interesting venues I have enjoyed performing at…

Makeney Hall Hotel

It is always a great pleasure to visit this beautiful hotel which is located in the serene landscape of the Amber Valley in Derbyshire. Derby itself was recently declared the ‘most haunted’ town in Britain, and the Derby Paranormal Hunters offer tours around places of supernatural interest. Makeney Hall is situated eight miles from Derby city centre and the present building dates from Victorian times. It certainly is a charming venue which is ideal for leisure breaks, weddings and corporate functions: http://www.akkeronhotels.com/Hotels/Central-and-Eastern-England/Makeney-Hall-Hotel The staff are extremely friendly and it was during a very interesting discussion with an employee that I first learned of the ghostly heritage of Makeney Hall. Stories of weird ‘presences’, inexplicable ‘figures’ appearing in hallways, and queer ‘rapping’ sounds aroused my curiosity. The gentleman in question had not experienced any of the aforementioned phenomena, however, a colleague of his seemed to genuinely believe that the building was haunted. Such unearthly tales may have developed from the times when Makeney Hall was used as a hospital.

The Ettington Park Hotel

Stratford Upon Avon is a magical town in its own right and is of course well known for its association with the bard. The dramatic neo-Gothic facades of The Ettington Park Hotel, which is to be found seven miles from the town centre, will enchant and captivate even the most seasoned of wayfarers. The hotel boasts several unearthly presences and specters which have been witnessed by a variety of people over the years: http://www.handpickedhotels.co.uk/hotels/ettington-park-hotel/History/ There would appear to be a multitude of psychic phenomena to be found, ranging from apparitions, to changes in temperature, and disembodied ethereal ‘voices’. As well as being a magnificent venue, the staff are always warm and welcoming. One employee I had the pleasure of chatting to openly discussed the existence of metaphysical happenings at the hotel and did firmly believe in the existence of ghosts. I look forward to performing magic at The Ettington Park Hotel on Christmas day and entertaining everyone whilst they enjoy the glowing hospitality. Hopefully the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future will appreciate the performance too and refrain from any spiritual heckling.

Mosborough Hall Hotel

The most recent wedding I performed at was that of Vickie and Stuart last Saturday in the pleasant environs of Mosborough Hall Hotel, Sheffield. It was a pleasure and a privilege to entertain everyone present and sample the first class hospitality of the venue. Prior to my performance, I took time to visit the hotel website and was amazed to discover that Mosborough Hall falls into the ‘haunted venue’ category: http://www.hauntedrooms.co.uk/mosborough-hall-hotel. This sixteenth century manor house clearly has a wealth of weird history for lovers of the uncanny to contemplate. Tales of a ‘large black dog’, ghostly ‘grey lady’, and of past owners calling upon the services of a local vicar to exorcise the building certainly do add to the mysterious charm of the location. Having said that, I was made to feel very welcome by the staff and the quality of the cuisine served in the restaurant is excellent. Any tales of ghosts or the supernatural can quickly be discounted within the modernised interior of the renovated manor house and spacious Chatsworth function suite. Indeed, on asking a member of staff about the possibility of psychic phenomena, I was assured that she had not witnessed anything strange. However, I always keep an open mind about these things…

Are There Are More Things In Heaven and Earth?

I consider myself very lucky to have performed magic for audiences at all of these wonderful venues and would highly recommend each to anyone planning a wedding, party, corporate event, or leisure break. Perhaps the possibility of witnessing something supernatural or uncanny during your stay can only entice you to visit? Most people are indeed intrigued by such mysteries and as Shakespeare himself said: ‘there are more things in heaven and earth’. I will be returning to all of these fine hotels in the future to perform magic and look forward to doing so. However, the ongoing prospect of learning about even more ‘haunted venues’ throughout the UK, and beyond, is always an interesting and intriguing aspect of my job as a professional magician.

Is the earth hollow? Are their worlds within our world? Was Jules Verne privy to spectacular occult knowledge?

Title: ‘This Hollow Earth’  Author: Warren Smith  Year of Publication: 1972

Product Details

Like some veiled demon conjured up by a black magician, the belief in a hollow earth is one of the most intriguing of the various occult mysteries.

The hollow earth theory is a mind-shattering proposal that there are gigantic holes at the north and south poles. These polar openings lead to a vast, unknown world inside the center of the earth. Some believers also claim the earth is honeycombed with a vast network of subterranean tunnels that lead down into an inner world.

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Hollow earth theory has drifted out of the occult mainstream in recent years and, understandably, is often scoffed at or just simply ignored, by both sceptics and advocates of the paranormal alike. The notion that the inner realms of our planet may in fact be domicile to large cities populated by hitherto undiscovered beings is just simply too ridiculous for many to even consider. Indeed, the scientific axiom of the layered earth, from crust to mantle to inner and outer core, is one of the first theories any curious child will learn about when reading even the most rudimentary of encyclopedias.

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However, is it not always interesting and exciting to challenge accepted mainstream knowledge, even if our rational selves may oppose this impulse? Why is it that many cultures throughout the ages have espoused some sort of belief or body of folklore which speaks of a curious world within our world? Does this elusive shadowy zone simply exist in a metaphysical sense, or is it something entirely tangible which the intrepid may care to visit?

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It is very interesting to note that recent scientific studies regarding the composition of the earth’s core remain inconclusive and we are constantly reviewing our rather limited understanding of the structure of our planet. In truth, it would appear that we know more about the surface of the moon, than the deepest, darkest recesses of our own world. With this in mind, I was intrigued to chance upon a copy of ‘This Hollow Earth’ by Warren Smith. I had read about this theory in the past and it has always interested me.

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Smith certainly provides food for thought and this text will stimulate anyone who wants to learn more about this rather outlandish of theories. The opening chapter whets the reader’s appetite as secret tunnels under the pyramids, UFOs from within the earth, the curious tale of Olaf Jansen (a Scandinavian sailor who claimed to have met the ‘Under-People’ within the earth), and stories of explorers’ bizarre experiences in polar regions are highlighted.

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However, it was the weird tale of labourers tunnelling beneath the River Thames in the 1960s which caught my attention. As Smith recounts:

the construction crewmen were spooked by a ‘thing’ which haunted the construction project

He further adds after one of the men was frightened away for good:

Whatever O’Brien saw in the tunnel must have been a frightening spectre. He was earning $312 a week when he walked away from the job…

Were the men simply hallucinating or does this account raise interesting questions regarding the existence of sinister subterranean beings?

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Smith’s discussion of Oriental beliefs in this area is certainly enlightening. Indeed, the Buddhist doctrine of the inner world is one that I was not aware of until reading ‘This Hollow Earth’:

Agharta is a subterranean land located deep within the centre of our planet. The Buddhists believe there are millions of people living in this underworld paradise.

He speaks eloquently of the romantic travels of western explorers into the Orient and of their encounters with holy men who spoke guardedly of the earth’s inner sanctum. Curious tales of a tunnel network from remote monasteries in Tibet are addressed:

These Tibetan tunnels are just part of a honeycomb of tunnels linking many parts of the world.

The mysterious lure of the Orient and the prospect of a revelation of truth has enticed many western mystics, occult scholars and religious groups for centuries.

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Indeed, the Nazi’s fascination with a possible pathway to an inner world via the Himalayas or North Pole is also addressed by Smith. Hitler’s occult beliefs are well documented, and there are accounts of several expeditions which were sent to explore Hollow Earth theory and find hidden tunnels during the period of the Third Reich. The Luminous Lodge of the Vril society drew inspiration from Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s work entitled ‘The Coming Race’ which was published in 1871. The prospect of establishing contact with a powerful race of supernatural beings within the inner earth, whose beliefs and social structure appeared to compliment those of Nazi ideology, clearly struck a chord within the German high command. Increased occult knowledge and power would surely provide the Nazis with an advantage over their enemies and they were clearly prepared to explore a variety of options (no matter how tenuous) to obtain this.

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‘This Hollow Earth’ may not be a classic of occult literature, but it can most certainly be appreciated and enjoyed by anyone who is curious about this peculiar theory. It raises some interesting questions and invites the reader to continue study within this fascinating area. Since its publication in 1972, there have been a variety of texts and articles written about the possibility of a world within our world. Notable contemporary writers who espouse this idea include the English author David Icke. This text is readily available on Amazon and vends for around £4. For more information about the author, visit David’s magical website: Magic and Illusion.

Voodoo, Black Magic and Sorcery in Deepest Darkest Africa…

Title: ‘Jungle Magic’ Author: James H. Neal Year of publication: 1966
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A fascinating biographical account of supernatural occurrences.

A thick black powder spread across a car seat… The European thought nothing of it. But to his African companion it was a sign, a deadly sign of a Ju-ju attack. A curse so potent that its victim was helpless -and doomed.
 
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‘Jungle Magic’ is a fascinating text which will be of great interest to anyone with an interest in Voodoo, the Occult, and matters cognate. This startling biographical account of James H Neale’s first-hand experiences of the Voodoo religion in Ghana during British rule in the 1950s will make even the most sceptical of souls consider the power and potency of this ancient faith.
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Neal arrived on the Gold Coast in 1952 having been appointed to the position of Chief Finance and Supplies Officer by the High Commissioner in London. He was responsible for cracking down on numerous criminal gangs which were involved in activities such as fraud, extortion and the large scale theft of building materials. Neal’s investigative work lead to the convictions of many powerful figures who were operating in the West African underworld. Loyal friendships and alliances were forged during his dangerous missions but, inevitably, bitter and sinister disenfranchised enemies became commonplace and were more than willing to use black magic to kill…
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Initially Neal scoffed at the notion of Voodoo and sinister forces from unseen realms. Like many Europeans of the time he believed it was mere hocus pocus and superstition. In the introduction he recounts his first impressions on the subject whilst listening to the terrible stories of other government officials in the European Club in Accra:
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‘This was fascinating – intelligent men, level-headed and highly qualified in their professions, giving credence to a lot of mumbo-jumbo.’
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However, after witnessing the power of Voodoo on several occasions, Neal’s point-of-view is radically altered. Indeed, an almost fatal attack from a black Ju-ju man is the penultimate stage in his process of conversion. It is only after the intervention of a white Ju-ju man (his colleague’s uncle) that he is able to make a full recovery:
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‘I made up my mind there and then that Ju-ju was far more than the harmless hocus-pocus I had thought it to be.’
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The startling accounts of Neale’s experiences in this exciting environment ensure that ‘Jungle Magic’ is a real page turner. But perhaps it is the consistency of his objective and rational narrative voice which make the preternatural occurrences all the more believable and frightening. He appears to deliver his anecdotes in an unassuming fashion calmly inviting the reader to make up his or her own mind about the veracity of Voodoo. Neale’s strength as a writer is most certainly his sobriety when faced with with such a controversial, sensitive and unworldly subject.
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Sympathetic magic, as well as the usage of amulets, potions and ritual, are all evident within this seemingly unknown classic. Neal’s detailed and engaging accounts will be of great interest to anyone with even just a passing interest in the Occult. At the finale of the sensational final chapter, Neal concludes:
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‘I came more than ever to the conclusion that many of these African Ju-ju men had powerful secrets of which very little was known in the West, and that it has been passed down from generation to generation.’
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I am amazed that ‘Jungle Magic’ is currently not in print and hardback copies vend for around £25 on Amazon. I was very fortunate to pick up a paperback edition in a local bookshop for £5. Hopefully you will be able to procure a copy if this subject is of interest to you. Why not visit my website for more things magical? Magical David Fox.
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